Brian Eno & Peter Chilvers at The Apple Store, Regent Street

I’m interviewing Brian & Peter about their new generative music app, Scape – and much more besides at the Regent St. Apple Store, London, 5.30pm on October 5th.

I’m looking forward to it immensely, but not without trepidation…

Come along!

The city of lights

Here I am sat like an rumpled, bearded stooge while it seems a city is carved with light from a block of aerogel in front of me.

Insanely-proud of being even peripherally-involved in this piece of work from Timo, Jack, Cam, Matt B., and Beeker.

I think this might be my new avatar image…

Websites and White Cubes

Dumb sign, originally uploaded by blackbeltjones.

Been asked to work on the nominations for designs of the year again at the Design Museum, which is very nice.
But it leads me back to this hoary old question – how should interactive work best be shown in a museum or gallery context? Should it be shown at all?

A Manhattan melange of “Macroscopes”

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Globe of Patents, originally uploaded by blackbeltjones.

By chance this morning found an excellent mini-exhibition in midtown Manhattan.

“Places & Spaces: Mapping Science” has been curated by Dr. Katy Börner and Deborah MacPherson.

From the website:

“Today, the word “science” encompasses myriad arenas of physical and abstract inquiry. This unique exhibition, at the Healy Hall in midtown Manhattan, uses innovative mapping techniques to physically show what and where science is today, how different branches of science relate to each other and where different branches of study are heading, where cutting edge science is erupting as archipelagos in the oceans of the yet unknown – and – how it all relates back to the physical centers of research. The world of science is turned into a navigable landscape.

Modern mapping imagery has come a long way from Ptolemy. In this stimulating show compelling for all ages and backgrounds, audiences will both visually and tactilely uncover how contemporary scientific thought has expanded. Such visualization of scientific progress is approached through computer-generated relationships, featured on large panels as well through the collaboration of New York based artists W. Bradford Paley, Digital Image Design Incorporated and Columbia University and Ingo Gunther with renowned scientist from the field of scientonometrics: Eugene Garfield, Henry Small, André Skupin, Steven A. Morris, Kevin Boyack and Dick Klavans.”

Scientonometrics! Awesome!!!

It’s a concise, enjoyable and clear exhibit showing concrete examples of what John Thackara might call ‘macroscopes’: artworks, mappings and visualisations of complex interconnected systems (in this case science and intellectual property) that help ‘ordinary folk’ examine the choices they make and those being made for them.

Recommended.

Re-generative

Clayton Cubitt and Tom Carden collaboration

A while back I posted a link to the collaboration between computational artist Tom Carden and photographer Clayton Cubitt.

Clayton’s family lost everything due to Hurricane Katrina (which he writes about here), and he is now selling prints of his work, including some of the collaboration with Tom (above); in order to help rebuild.

I just snagged myself a Brooklyn scenetake a look and see if there’s something you like.

Clayton Cubitt interviews Tom Carden on “Generative Art”

Tom and Clayton collaborated on a set of beautiful images this year, and now Clayton has published a short interview with Tom on his site.

Tom discusses with Clayton his reaction to the finished work and the process they shared to create it; but also his route to generative art, it’s history and his influences:

“Before mass access to computers, people used other hardware, tools, toys and rule-sets to make algorithmic and process-driven art – pendulums, spirographs, Indian rangolis, Celtic knots, mandalas and so on – and a lot of the methods people use in computer generated art were investigated by mathematicians by hand before computers were available, such as Fibonacci series and the Golden Ratio. Casey Reas has looked into Kinetic Sculpture in some depth, and that’s something I keep intending to read up on. I’m sure that before computers were around the same things that people like about generative art were satisfied by fireworks, fountains, may poles, crop circles, wax lamps and oscilloscopes. Grid-based games such as Go and Othello are very reminiscent of the patterns created by certain types of Cellular Automata, too. The main advantage with using a computer is speed, such that there is now scope for using any of these systems over long periods of time and with minute variations.”

Beautiful stuff – congratulations to both artists.

Tracks in the city


This is "Ghetto Superstar"
Originally uploaded by blackbeltjones.

This is Pras, ODB and Mya’s “Ghetto Superstar”: a visualisation from Jake Elliot’s PopSketchSeries.

Artists statement:

“this is a series of drawings generated from pop songs. the songs are analyzed note-by-note. at each note, a line is drawn. the angle at which the line is drawn is determined by the pitch of the note and the length of the line is determined by the volume of the note. the result is a series of playful, doodle-like, linear drawings.

Imagine taking music visualisation, mixing in play and embodiment into the mobile realm – mobile music players allowing you to trace your tracks like a demented Logo Turtle through the city.

Joined-up listening – groups and groupies conga together through the streets propelled by a programmatic peer-2-peer pied piper.

Dance Dance Dance Situationist Revolution.

Vib Ribbon Reality…